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Title: Acoma Pottery Design Motifs

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight

The development of bread bowls and an explanation of common design motifs.

Bread Bowls When the Spaniards introduced wheat and various fruits and vegetables to the Southwest, the Acomas and Lagunas began to need new sizes and shapes of vessels for food preparation and storage. One of these was the large dough bowl, up to 1...

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Title: Last Living Apache Scout

Source(s): Indeh: An Apache Odyssey

Author(s): Big Mouth (Author); Eve Ball (Author)

Big Mouth describes the defeat and imprisonment of his people at Fort Sumner.

I am Big Mouth, last living scout of the Apache wars. I served in the campaigns against Victorio and Geronimo. I do not know my exact age, but I was six or seven years old when my people, the Mescalero Apaches, were forced into captivity at Fort Sumn...

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Title: San Carlos Reservation

Source(s): Indeh: An Apache Odyssey

Author(s): Asa (Ace) Daklugie (Author); Eve Ball (Editor)

Asa Daklugie describes the San Carlos reservation.

San Carlos! That was the worst place in all the great territory stolen from the Apaches. If anybody had ever lived there permanently, no Apache knew of it. Where there is no grass there is no game. Nearly all of the vegetation was cacti; and though i...

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Title: Laguna

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight

People from neighboring Acoma and other pueblos established Laguna Pueblo in the last years of the 1600s. In 1699, Governor Cubero of Nuevo México formally named the pueblo San José de la Laguna (“Saint Joseph of the Lake”). The name refers to ...

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Title: Salt of the Earth

Author(s): Michael Wilson (Author); Deborah S. Rosenfelt (Author); Michael Wilson (Author)

This script for a movie describes staging a strike by Mexican-American workers against the Empire Zinc Mine in Hanover, New Mexico, 1950-1952. The strike really happened, and the movie made it famous.

Medium shot: the first truck. The Anglo scabs standing in the back of the truck react in fear and consternation. But they stay where they are. Medium long shot: miners on hillside. A group of them start coming down the hill. We can see Charley an...

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Title: The Taking of San Joaquin, October 1966

Source(s): They Called Me “King Tiger”: My Struggle for the Land and Our Rights

Author(s): Reies López Tijerina (Author); José Gutiérrez (Translator)

In the 1960s, Reies Lopez Tijerina organized northern New Mexico villagers as descendants of original land grantees in a series of protests and demonstrations to recover their rights to the land.

That the government would question the right of the people to their land was a cruel and unjust violation of the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo. I now sought to open a new door to the halls of justice. When Ed Stanton fought for the grant in Socorro, he...

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Title: The First Hispanic Telegraph Operator

Author(s): Felix Gabaldon (Author); Shawn Kelley (Oral Historian); William Penner (Editor)

Felix Gabaldon talks about being the first Hispanic to work in a depot on the Santa Fe Railway in eastern New Mexico.

My first job was in Abo, about three weeks, maybe, and then I bumped somebody in Mountainair. I was there three, four years, then I went to Fort Sumner, worked there another maybe six, seven months. From Fort Sumner, I went to Roswell then to Dexter....

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Title: El Velador del Cañon de Abo

Author(s): Eliseo R. Sisneros (Author); Shawn Kelley (Oral Historian); William Penner (Editor)

Eliseo R. Sisneros talks about working for the Santa Fe Railway in eastern New Mexico.

One night there was a rock come down in Abo Canyon and it hit the electric warning fence and knocked a hole in it. They called the Belen Section and couldn’t find a foreman. So I went up there with the assistant foreman and a bunch of men to help t...

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Title: Wherever The Work Took Us, That’s Where We Went

Author(s): Randy Dunson (Author); Shawn Kelley (Oral Historian); William Penner (Editor)

Randy Dunson talks about growing up on the Belen Cutoff and the experiences his father, a track supervisor for the Santa Fe Railway in eastern New Mexico, had with Navajo work gangs.

The first eight years of my life were spent in a 40-foot wooden boxcar converted for living quarters. Up and down the Belen Cutoff; just wherever the work took us that’s where we went. I made every school between Clovis and Belen, except Yeso. We w...

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Results Found: 9