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Title: Zuni Pottery Designs

Source(s): The Pueblo Potter: A Study of Creative Imagination in Primitive Art

Author(s): Ruth Bunzel (Author)

Zuni pottery designs.

The Deer’s House (nawe awan k”yakwenne) Use: On the body of water jars or the interior of bowls. “We paint the deer so that our husbands can have good luck hunting. Deerskins are so expensive we cannot buy them anymore, and so we like to have ...

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Title: The Pueblo Potter: A Study of Creative Imagination in Primitive Art

Author(s): Ruth Bunzel (Author)

A Pueblo potter explains how to teach a girl to make a pot.

When a girl starts to make a jar, I should tell her to take a handful of clay about the size of a cup, and to work it in her hands, using two fingers, until it is like a cup. Then she should put it in a mold and roll strips of clay about as thick as ...

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Title: A Zuni Life: A Pueblo Indian in Two Worlds

Author(s): Virgil Wyaco (Author)

A Zuni Indian writes about leaving the pueblo to attend the BIA boarding school in Albuquerque in 1936.

In 1936, when I was in the sixth grade, I heard about the Indian School in Albuquerque, one of the BIA boarding schools, and I thought about having a different lifestyle and learning new things in a big city. My principal, Mrs. Gonzales, sent in an a...

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Title: Nampeyo

Source(s): The Legacy of a Master Potter, Nampeyo and Her Descendants

Author(s): Ruth Bunzel (Author); Mary Ellen (Editor); Lawrence Blair (Editor)

It is impossible to state what a potter receives. The method of marketing operates very unfavorably to the potter. The villages are very remote from the market; consequently the whole output is disposed of to Tom Pavatea, the local trader, in return ...

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Title: About the Snake Dance

Source(s): Dancing Gods: Indian Ceremonials of New Mexico and Arizona

Author(s): Erna Fergusson (Author)

Undoubtedly the Snake Dance is the most ancient ceremony we still may see, for it is the direct worship of the clan ancestor, who is the snake. [Anthropologist Jesse] Fewkes, who holds this opinion, says that the dance was also originally a water cer...

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Title: The Snake Dance

Source(s): Dancing Gods: Indian Ceremonials of New Mexico and Arizona

Author(s): Erna Fergusson (Author)

In time, a long time, the warning rattling is heard and the antelope priests appear, walking quickly. They repeat the evolution of the day before, and their costumes are the same, but the effect somehow is much more tense. The whole crowd is held sil...

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Title: The Snake Legend

Source(s): Dancing Gods: Indian Ceremonials of New Mexico and Arizona

Author(s): Erna Fergusson (Author)

Once a chief’s son sat on the edge of the Grand Canyon, wondering where all that water went. He thought that he might be able to help his people if he should follow it; so, on the advice of his father, he built a boat, enclosed like a box, and set ...

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Title: Navajo

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight

Navajo history: early migration from Alaska and Canada to encounters with the Spanish and war with the United States; concludes with an account of contemporary Navajo life.

Traditional Navajo, or Diné, stories tell that First Man, First Woman, the Holy People, and all the animals had to pass through three different worlds before emerging into the Fourth or Glittering World. Here, the People saw four rivers bounded by f...

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Title: The Arrival of My Mother —New Mexico Territory, 1906

Source(s): Lion’s Gate Selected Poems 1963-1986

Author(s): Keith Wilson (Author)

Poem describing the author’s mother’s arrival in New Mexico territory at the age of 25.

She got off, according to her diary, dressed in a lovely beaded gown, fresh from Washington with sixteen trunks of ballgowns, chemises, blouses (4 Middle), shoes and assorted lingerie. She was at that time about 25, old for an unmarried wom...

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Title: ¡Baile y baile y sin harina! [Broke, but Dancing Up a Storm!]

Source(s): Abuelitos: Stories of the Río Puerco

Author(s): Teodorita García-Ruelas (Author); Nasario García (Editor)

Teodorita García-Ruelas remembers the early days ranching and farming in the Rio Puerco Valley.

Oh! The rancher’s life is the happiest in the world, because you’re your own boss, and everything you raise goes farther. I don’t know what it is, but like today’s jobs, they don’t last. But the rancher’s life is the happiest. Well, a...

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