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Title: 1910

Source(s): Chants

Author(s): Pat Mora (Author)

A poem about discrimination along the Texas-Mexico border.

In Mexico they bowed their heads when she passed. Timid villagers stepped aside for the Judge's mother, Doña Luz, who wore her black shawl, black gloves whenever she left her home— at the church, the mercado, and the plaza in th...

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Title: Acoma Pottery Design Motifs

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight

The development of bread bowls and an explanation of common design motifs.

Bread Bowls When the Spaniards introduced wheat and various fruits and vegetables to the Southwest, the Acomas and Lagunas began to need new sizes and shapes of vessels for food preparation and storage. One of these was the large dough bowl, up to 1...

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Title: Borrowed Feathers: Don’t Look Up: Back to Life

Source(s): Pueblo Indian Folk Tales

Author(s): Hocheni of Acoma (Author); Elsie Clews Parsons (Oral Historian); N. V. Sanchez (Translator)

Coyote has a hard time with some pigeons and a spider.

Long ago at Hanishoku [a ruin near Acoma] the pigeons (houk) were flying about. They gave Coyote some of their feathers to fly with. Coyote (chuski) was heavy and lagged behind. The pigeons said, “Let us fly up to the water-hole on top of the mesa!...

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Title: Who Were the Lipan and the Kiowa-Apaches?

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight

An introduction to the Lipan and Kiowa-Apache peoples.

Two small Apache tribes, the Lipan and the Kiowa-Apache, lived on the western Great Plains during the early 1600s. Today they have become part of the other Apache tribes. Very few of those living today remember the Lipan and the Kiowa-Apache tribal ...

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Title: Cattle

Source(s): Indeh: An Apache Odyssey

Author(s): Daklugie (Author); Eve Ball (Author)

Daklugie describes how he became a cattle rancher and dealt with some rustlers.

So I took over. The government had given the prisoners a start in cattle, and in one year some of the men had become fairly good at handling them. All were good horsemen, but they had to learn how to rope and to flank calves. I had not done that eith...

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Title: Hopi Religion and the Missionaries

Source(s): Hopi Voices: Recollections, Traditions, and Narratives of the Hopi Indians

Author(s): Nuvayoiyava (Albert Yava), Tewa Village (Author); Harold Courlander (Editor)

We old-timers can see that there has been a steady drift away from our traditional attitude toward nature and the universe. What I’m talking about is not the dancing and the kiva paraphernalia, all those visible things. They are only a means of exp...

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Title: ¡Baile y baile y sin harina! [Broke, but Dancing Up a Storm!]

Source(s): Abuelitos: Stories of the Río Puerco

Author(s): Teodorita García-Ruelas (Author); Nasario García (Editor)

Teodorita García-Ruelas remembers the early days ranching and farming in the Rio Puerco Valley.

Oh! The rancher’s life is the happiest in the world, because you’re your own boss, and everything you raise goes farther. I don’t know what it is, but like today’s jobs, they don’t last. But the rancher’s life is the happiest. Well, a...

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Title: La Tierra Amarilla: Its History, Architecture, and Cultural Landscape

Author(s): Chris Wilson (Author); David Kammer (Author)

A brief history of the Tierra Amarilla land grant.

Two events in the early 1880s marked a turning point in the development of the region. The effects of the first, the arrival of the railroad in 1880, were quickly felt; the effects of the second, the final confirmation of the Tierra Amarilla Grant in...

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Title: The Apache Diaries: A Father-Son Journey (excerpts)

Author(s): Grenville Goodwin (Author); Neil Goodwin (Author)

Neil Goodwin retraces the steps of his father, anthropologist Grenville Goodwin, who tried to find Chiricahua Apache groups living in the Sierra Madre of Mexico.

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Title: I’ve Done My Bit on the Border

Source(s): Chapter Four: Revenge and Reprisal; Border Fury: A Picture Postcard Record of Mexico’s Revolution and U.S. War Preparedness, 1910-1917

Author(s): James J. Verhoeks (Author); Paul J. Vanderwood (Author); Frank N. Samponaro (Author)

A poem by a bugler in the 32nd Michigan Infantry, which served on the US-Mexico border in 1916.

I’ve done my bit on the border I wish I was in God’s country again I’ve had my fill of the border Of Greasers and border men I’ve eaten the dirt of Texas I’ve drank of the Rio Grande I’ve grubbed mesquite in the cursed heat (The Lo...

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