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Title: Lanyade

Source(s): The Navajo and Pueblo Silversmiths

Author(s): John Adair (Author)

The first Zuni silversmith was a man named Lanyade. He tells this story at the age of 95.

When I was a young man about thirty years old [1872], a Navajo came to Zuni who knew how to make silver. This man’s Navajo name was Atsidi Chon. I had traveled through the Navajo country a good many times, on my way to the Hopi villages, and I knew ...

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Title: Nampeyo

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight

How Nampeyo revived old design traditions among Hopi potters.

During the 1870s and 1880s, a young Hopi woman named Nampeyo searched for potsherds in the ancient village of Sikyatki on First Mesa. Nampeyo was the daughter of Qotca Ka-o (White Corn), who was a member of the Tewa Corn Clan. Her Hopi father was a ...

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Title: Solomon Bibo

Source(s): Trail Dust

Author(s): Marc Simmons (Author)

Historian Marc Simmons sketches the life of Solomon Bibo, a German Jewish American who served as Governor of Acoma Pueblo.

Solomon Bibo, born in German Prussia in 1853, was one of eleven children. Right after our Civil War (1861-1865), two older Bibo brothers, Nathan and Simon, immigrated to the United States. They came to Santa Fe, where Nathan worked for the Spiegel...

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Title: Who Were the Lipan and the Kiowa-Apaches?

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight

An introduction to the Lipan and Kiowa-Apache peoples.

Two small Apache tribes, the Lipan and the Kiowa-Apache, lived on the western Great Plains during the early 1600s. Today they have become part of the other Apache tribes. Very few of those living today remember the Lipan and the Kiowa-Apache tribal ...

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Title: Last of the Lipans

Source(s): Indeh: An Apache Odyssey

Author(s): Philemon Venego (Author); Eve Ball (Author)

Philemon Venego describes the arrival of the Lipán Apaches at the Mesacalero reservation.

I remember the trip well. I was about nine or ten years old, I think, and understood that we were to see our relatives and friends and have a home on the reservation. When we got off the train, there were Apaches with wagons at the station to meet us...

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Title: White Eyes

Source(s): Indeh: An Apache Odyssey

Author(s): Philemon Venego (Author); Eve Ball (Author)

Philemon Venego describes what his people thought of whites when they first saw them.

Though I live on the Mescalero Apache Reservation, I am a Lipan. We were that branch of the Apaches who roamed, for the greater part of the time, east of the Rio Pecos and claimed all of that land to the Gulf of Mexico. Our rights were disputed by ot...

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Title: Silver City Days and Billy’’s Mother

Source(s): They ““Knew” Billy the Kid: Interviews with Old-Time New Mexicans

Author(s): Louis Abraham (Author); Robert F. Kadlec (Editor); Mrs. Frances Totty (WPA Field Writer)

A childhood friend of Billy the Kid describes his mother, Mrs. Bill Antrim.

Mrs. Bill Antrim was a jolly Irish lady, full of life, and her fun and mischief. Mrs. Antrim could dance the Highland Fling as well as the best of the dancers. There were very few American boys in Silver City when the Antrims lived here, therefor...

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Title: Trading in the Americas

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight

A brief overview of trading in the Americas.

For hundreds of years, indigenous people of the American Southwest, whether on the move or in permanent settlements, traded among themselves. Archeologists have found shells from the Pacific Ocean, parrot feathers from Mexico, and turquoise from dist...

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Title: La Tierra Amarilla: Its History, Architecture, and Cultural Landscape

Author(s): Chris Wilson (Author); David Kammer (Author)

A brief history of the Tierra Amarilla land grant.

Two events in the early 1880s marked a turning point in the development of the region. The effects of the first, the arrival of the railroad in 1880, were quickly felt; the effects of the second, the final confirmation of the Tierra Amarilla Grant in...

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Title: The Taking of San Joaquin, October 1966

Source(s): They Called Me “King Tiger”: My Struggle for the Land and Our Rights

Author(s): Reies López Tijerina (Author); José Gutiérrez (Translator)

In the 1960s, Reies Lopez Tijerina organized northern New Mexico villagers as descendants of original land grantees in a series of protests and demonstrations to recover their rights to the land.

That the government would question the right of the people to their land was a cruel and unjust violation of the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo. I now sought to open a new door to the halls of justice. When Ed Stanton fought for the grant in Socorro, he...

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Results Found: 10