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Title: Acoma Pottery Design Motifs

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight

The development of bread bowls and an explanation of common design motifs.

Bread Bowls When the Spaniards introduced wheat and various fruits and vegetables to the Southwest, the Acomas and Lagunas began to need new sizes and shapes of vessels for food preparation and storage. One of these was the large dough bowl, up to 1...

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Title: Solomon Bibo

Source(s): Trail Dust

Author(s): Marc Simmons (Author)

Historian Marc Simmons sketches the life of Solomon Bibo, a German Jewish American who served as Governor of Acoma Pueblo.

Solomon Bibo, born in German Prussia in 1853, was one of eleven children. Right after our Civil War (1861-1865), two older Bibo brothers, Nathan and Simon, immigrated to the United States. They came to Santa Fe, where Nathan worked for the Spiegel...

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Title: Traditional Apache Life

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight

An overview of some important events and themes in the lives of Apaches.

The Athapaskan peoples migrated south from Alaska and Canada and eventually split into seven distinct groups. By 1500, they occupied a vast expanse of territory in the American Southwest. The extreme environments they inhabited—mountains, deserts, ...

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Title: Who Were the Lipan and the Kiowa-Apaches?

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight

An introduction to the Lipan and Kiowa-Apache peoples.

Two small Apache tribes, the Lipan and the Kiowa-Apache, lived on the western Great Plains during the early 1600s. Today they have become part of the other Apache tribes. Very few of those living today remember the Lipan and the Kiowa-Apache tribal ...

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Title: Silver City Days and Billy’’s Mother

Source(s): They ““Knew” Billy the Kid: Interviews with Old-Time New Mexicans

Author(s): Louis Abraham (Author); Robert F. Kadlec (Editor); Mrs. Frances Totty (WPA Field Writer)

A childhood friend of Billy the Kid describes his mother, Mrs. Bill Antrim.

Mrs. Bill Antrim was a jolly Irish lady, full of life, and her fun and mischief. Mrs. Antrim could dance the Highland Fling as well as the best of the dancers. There were very few American boys in Silver City when the Antrims lived here, therefor...

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Title: Bishop Lamy’s Five Rules for the Brotherhood of Penance, October 27, 1856

Source(s): The Santa Fe New Mexico Sentinel (January 26, 1938, p. 2); Brothers of Light, Brothers of Blood: The Penitentes of the Southwest

Author(s): Bishop Lamy (Author); Monsignor Philip F. Mahoney (Translator); Marta Weigle (Author)

Bishop Lamy’s Five Rules for the Brotherhood of Penance.

In this the year 1857, there have been granted by His Grace Don Juan Lamy, the permission to continue the devotion of the Passion and Death of Our Lord, Jesus Christ, as a penance, by all its devotees. The rules, granted on petition of the President ...

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Title: Penitentes

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight

A brief description of the Penitente Brotherhood and the Hispano communities it served.

During the 1600s and 1700s, Hispano settlers in present-day New Mexico lived in small isolated poblaciones, or communities. They built adobe houses, dug acequias (irrigation ditches), and planted their crops along these ditches. The settlers lived in...

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Title: Tierra Amarilla

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight

A brief history of Tierra Amarilla.

The village of Tierra Amarilla lies in the Chama River Valley. Groups of hunters and gatherers lived in this valley as far back as about 5,000 years ago. Archaeologists know about at least ten significant pueblo sites along the Chama River, between p...

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Title: The Taking of San Joaquin, October 1966

Source(s): They Called Me “King Tiger”: My Struggle for the Land and Our Rights

Author(s): Reies López Tijerina (Author); José Gutiérrez (Translator)

In the 1960s, Reies Lopez Tijerina organized northern New Mexico villagers as descendants of original land grantees in a series of protests and demonstrations to recover their rights to the land.

That the government would question the right of the people to their land was a cruel and unjust violation of the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo. I now sought to open a new door to the halls of justice. When Ed Stanton fought for the grant in Socorro, he...

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Results Found: 9