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Title: Mothers-in-Law Are Avoided by Navajos: “The Old Owl” is Term Applied by the Braves

Author(s): Unidentified (Author)

Why Navajo males avoid all contact with their mothers-in-law; the consequences of meeting or making eye contact.

Gallup, N.M., March 5, 1937. (AP)—Mother-in-law may be queen in Texas today, but to Navajo Indian braves she is still “the old owl,” to be avoided with more fear than the very “Chindi”—devil. And it’s no joke to the Navajos, either. ...

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Title: Navajo Secrets Lost as Greatest Medicine Man Dies

Author(s): Unidentified (Author); Associated Press

Navajo shaman Hosteen Klah dies at 70; with him go many secrets of Navajo spiritual ceremony.

REHOBOTH MISSION, N.M., March 3, 1937. (AP)—The spirit of the greatest of Navajo medicine men winged a weary journey around the world today, and with it flew many a precious secret of the tribe’s religious life. Four times, says Navajo religio...

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Title: El Corrido de Inmigrante (Ballad of an Immigrant)

Source(s): Alambrista and the U.S.-Mexico Border: Film, Music, and Stories of Undocumented Workers; Mexican Voices/American Dreams: An Oral History of Mexican Immigration to the United States

Author(s): Unidentified (Author); Nicholas J. Cull (Editor); Marilyn P. Davis

A Mexican ballad, or corrido, about how sad people are when they have to leave home to go to the United States.

Mexico, my homeland, where I was born, Give me the benediction of your powerful hand, I’m going to the United States to earn my living, Good-bye, my beloved country, I carry you in my heart, Don’t condemn me for leaving my country, Poverty a...

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Title: Navajo Revive an Ancient Ceremonial

Source(s): Southwest Tourist News

Author(s): Unidentified (Author)

Description of Navajo rituals conducted to break the drought near Ganado, NM.

July 17, 1936. Fear of a devastating drouth has turned the Navajo living in the Ganado, Arizona, district to a rain-making ritual that has not been enacted in years, according to Roman Hubbell, Navajo trader. Under the direction of Beninie, Ganado...

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Title: Navajo Medicine Man Requests Christian Burial

Author(s): Unidentified (Author)

The death of Navajo shaman Hosteen Klah; description of his Christian burial and traditional Navajo ceremonies.

Gallup, N.M., March 4, 1937 (AP)—Hosteen Klah, powerful Navajo shaman, master of a thousand pagan chants, was buried Wednesday with Christian ceremonies. Only in death did Klah, regarded by all his tribe as the most powerful of medicine men, for...

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Title: Indian Traders: Recent Aspersions of Jake Morgan

Source(s): Southwest Tourist News

Author(s): Unidentified (Author)

A Navajo trader defends his profession against charges made by Jake Morgan, a former member of the Navajo Tribal Council.

The unwarranted attack on the traders to the Navajo Indians by Jake Morgan, former member of the Navajo tribal council, and the subsequent denial by the United Indian Traders Association, brings to an issue the status of the trader in Navajo affairs....

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Title: El Deportado (The Deportee)

Source(s): Alambrista and the U.S.-Mexico Border: Film, Music, and Stories of Undocumented Workers; El Deportado, Texas-Mexican Border Music, Part I, Arhollie Records (Berkeley, 1975)

Author(s): Unidentified (Artist); Nicholas J. Cull (Editor); David Carrasco (Editor)

A ballad, or corrido, from the time of the Mexican Revolution (1910-1920).

Adios mi madre querida, Hechame su benedición, Ya me voy al extranjero, Donde no hay revolución. Goodbye my beloved mother, Give me your blessings, I am going abroad, Where there is no revolution.

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Title: Santo Domingo Pueblo Stereoview, ca. 1900

Source(s): Pueblo Indians Making Bread

Author(s): Unidentified (Photographer)

Pueblo Indians Making Bread, Santo Domingo, N. M.

Santo Domingo is an interesting and old-fashioned pueblo, built on the east bank of the Rio Grande, in New Mexico. In the four broad and dirty streets may be seen the huge outdoor ovens shown in the picture, often with heaps of firewood piled near t...

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Title: Cooney Canyon

Author(s): Unidentified (WPA Field Writer)

A skirmish between Apaches and US soldiers led by Sargeant James C. Clooney, who was later killed by Victorio's band.

Cooney Canyon received its name in memory of James C. Cooney who was killed in a battle with Victorio’s Apache Indians who attacked the little settlement of Alma on April 28, 1880. Cooney had been to Alma to warn the settlers that the Indians were ...

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Title: Elfego Baca

Author(s): Unidentified (WPA Field Writer)

Elfego Baca, deputy sheriff of Socorro, holds off an angry mob of towns people on the Plaza of the Frisco, 125 miles from Socorro, until help arrives.

In _____ the rustlers in Texas, no-mans-land, and Indian Territory, _______ __________ became so bold and were stealing and robbing so constantly that the deputy U.S. Marshals in Indian Territory made a concerted effort to clean house. Most of the...

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