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Title: Warriors: Navajo Code Talkers

Author(s): Kenji Kawano (Author); Thomas H. Begay (Author); Samuel Tom Holiday (Author)

A Navajo Code Talker remembers fighting with the Marines in the South Pacific during World War II.

Thomas H. Begay, Tsi’ najinii and Ashiihi Clans, was a member of the 5th Marine Division and saw combat on Hawai`i, Enewetak Atoll, Guam, Tinian, Saipan, and Iwo Jima. We were disciplined....I learned to survive combat. The first hour, I was wit...

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Title: Father Greyrobe: Was He or Wasn’t He?

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight

Account of a Spanish priest who may have survived the Pueblo Revolt.

Catholicism was the religion of Spanish conquest. By the late 1600s, it had dominated Pueblo life for well over a century. In the wake of the Pueblo Revolt of 1680, few signs of it remained. The leaders killed the mission priests and burned the churc...

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Title: Nampeyo

Author(s): Southwest Crossroads Spotlight

How Nampeyo revived old design traditions among Hopi potters.

During the 1870s and 1880s, a young Hopi woman named Nampeyo searched for potsherds in the ancient village of Sikyatki on First Mesa. Nampeyo was the daughter of Qotca Ka-o (White Corn), who was a member of the Tewa Corn Clan. Her Hopi father was a ...

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Title: Letter from Brigider General James H. Carlton to Brigider General Lorenzo Thomas, December 1,1863

Source(s): The Indian Policy

Author(s): James H. Carlton (Author); Richard Fowler (WPA Field Writer)

Brigider General James Carlton writes to Brigider General Lorenzo Thomas putting forth his plan to relocate the Navajos to Fort Sumner.

Dec. 1, 1863 THE INDIAN POLICY Headquarters, Dept. of New Mexico Santa Fe, New Mexico GENERAL: I have the honor to report that I have this week sent 51 Navajo Indians, men, women and children, to Fort Sumner, at the Bosque Redondo on the P...

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Title: He Had Ten Wagons When He Came To New Mexico

Author(s): Richard Spencer (Author); Shawn Kelley (Oral Historian); William Penner (Editor)

Richard discusses how his grandfather, B. B. Spencer, came to New Mexico and started the first sawmill in the Manzano area.

As far as I know, he was the first Anglo that got here and he started the first mill in the area. The Kaysers, I think, were close behind him or right about that same time. He brought a boiler for the mill through Oklahoma to White Oaks. Supposedly i...

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Title: Agarró nomás la Cuarto [He Just Grabbed the Whip]

Source(s): Abuelitos: Stories of the Rio Puerco Valley

Author(s): Eduardo Valdez (Author); Nasario García (Editor)

Oral historian Nasario García interviewed many elders from the Río Puerco area of New Mexico, including Eduardo Valdez, who remembers the early days and the best cowboy around, Don Teodoro.

This Don Teodoro, and several others, not only him, because there were several horsemen there in Guadalupe, they say one day they penned up a herd of horses in a corral. And long ago they used to put two long poles on the corral and then they'd put a...

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Title: Expedition into New Mexico Made by Antonio de Espejo 1582-1583 as Revealed in the Journal of Diego Pérez de Luxan, a Member of the Party

Author(s): Diego Pérez de Luxan (Author); George Hammond (Editor); Agapito Rey (Editor)

A merchant from New Spain journeys north as head of a relief party to find two Franciscan monks. Here he describes what his party found at Zuni.

We set out from this place on the fourteenth of the month and marched a league. We halted at the first pueblo of the province of Zuni which they called Malaque, in which we had a row of houses (for our use), and they gave us to eat of what they had u...

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Title: Lanyade

Source(s): The Navajo and Pueblo Silversmiths

Author(s): John Adair (Author)

The first Zuni silversmith was a man named Lanyade. He tells this story at the age of 95.

When I was a young man about thirty years old [1872], a Navajo came to Zuni who knew how to make silver. This man’s Navajo name was Atsidi Chon. I had traveled through the Navajo country a good many times, on my way to the Hopi villages, and I knew ...

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Title: Keneshde Tells His Story

Source(s): The Navajo and Pueblo Silversmiths

Author(s): Keneshde (Author); John Adair (Author)

A Zuni silversmith tells how he got the first piece of turquoise when he was fifteen from a mine east of Santo Domingo.

When I was a boy about fifteen years old, I used to help Kwaisedemon, who was my grandfather, make silver. He was my father's father, and at that time he was an old man. It was hard work for him to pound out silver, so I used to do that for him. In r...

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Title: As for the Natives

Author(s): Diego de Vargas (Author)

Diego de Vargas’ comment on the people of Acoma when he returned to New Mexico in 1692.

“...As for the natives of the rock of Acoma, since they are a distance of twenty-four leagues from Isleta, and also those of the province of Zuni, they may be left as they are.”

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