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Title: A Hundred And Fifty Dollars For A Section!

Author(s): Sylvestre Sisneros (Author); Shawn Kelley (Oral Historian); William Penner (Editor)

Sylvestre Sisneros talks about the way his family homesteaded south of Abo ruins during the Depression.

Okay, there was about five sections south of Abo near Chupadero Mesa that they couldn’t dispose of it under the original Homestead Act (which only allowed 160 acres), because the land didn’t have any water. It was good grazing, but it was far ou...

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Title: He Had Ten Wagons When He Came To New Mexico

Author(s): Richard Spencer (Author); Shawn Kelley (Oral Historian); William Penner (Editor)

Richard discusses how his grandfather, B. B. Spencer, came to New Mexico and started the first sawmill in the Manzano area.

As far as I know, he was the first Anglo that got here and he started the first mill in the area. The Kaysers, I think, were close behind him or right about that same time. He brought a boiler for the mill through Oklahoma to White Oaks. Supposedly i...

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Title: They Used To Steal The Comanchita And Take Her To One Of The Reyes’ Houses

Author(s): Polly Sisneros (Author); Shawn Kelley (Oral Historian); William Penner (Editor)

Polly Sisneros recalls the dances and religious celebrations and ceremonies that occurred in Scholle and the surrounding areas.

They used to have parties! That was a party town. Oh my God! My dad worked in this pool hall. That’s how come we came to Scholle, because Mr. Brazil wanted my dad to manage the pool hall. They used to have the dances there on a big ol’ patio be...

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Title: Life At the Sais Crusher

Author(s): Bill Huckabay (Author); Shawn Kelley (Oral Historian); William Penner (Editor)

Bill Huckabay talks about life at the Sais Crusher where his father worked for the railroad overseeing quarry operations.

My dad was working as civil engineer for the railroad, and it was his job to make sure the contractor was doing what they were supposed to do at the crusher. My friend Albert McNeil’s dad (Louis McNeil) was the superintendent for the contracting co...

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